If only you could learn well enough

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Scratching the head is more common than biting nails. It’s not a habit, but a gesture of perplexion or a confused state of mind.

The brain is a biological disk with about a million gigabytes of storage. There’s a lot of information it has captured, and more is pouring in every minute. The problem is in retrieving it.

Although there are no golden rules to better memory, we can sometimes exploit the ways our brain looks at information.

What is the most important part?

The mind captures things that are significant.

There is this story of a servant, to whom the master orders to count the…


And the mutually exclusive lies

Neither money nor luxury can buy peace. If only it were the case, Buddha wouldn’t forsake his lavishing palace and richness to attain spiritual tranquility.

Buddha’s sacrifice returned to him as enlightenment. Wisdom did not come easy. He unlearned things that seem usual and understood things that didn’t look logical.

Here are some thoughts that materialized after reading Buddha's enlightening life stories.

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Being intelligent is (NOT) everything

Intelligent people are the pillars of science and society. They have their influence on us. But does humankind benefit from intelligent people in all ways? Are they even at peace?…

A hacker often is more intelligent than a…


And here’s how you do it in just 15 minutes.

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As a logistician, I have a tedious job. Though not full of sweat, but stress and anxiety shoot up for most of the day.

When I return home in the evening, I get exhausted enough to flatten on the bed. The flashes of work-bitten day constantly pop up in my mind and I can barely get rid of it. I try to read books, but the tired mind barely concentrates. I neither feel like watching movies nor talking to anyone, eventually wasting another evening.

For months, I went through this routine and struggled to freshen myself, but failed. …


Wishing the Sun — A Happy New Year

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Today is the first day of the year according to the Sun calendar followed by many Hindus around the world. We mark it by the first day of “Baisakh” month according to Bikram Sambat (B.S.) which counts around 56.7 years ahead of the Gregorian Calendar marked by the birth of Jesus Christ.

The Tuar Rajput emperor Vikramaditya of Ujjain found the Bikram Sambat following his victory over the Sakas in 56 B.C.

From an astrological point of view, the first day of Baisakh is also the day when Sun enters the first sign of the Zodiac — Aries, in which…


Who stirred the oceans?

The past 100 years saw a fundamental change in the understanding of how possibly did life originate on Earth.

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Origin of life is among the most pursued questions raised by humanity throughout centuries. The query turned even more resolute after science overthrew away the old beliefs and myths attributed solely to the gods. When men turned to science for the answers, they shifted their focus gradually from priests to scientists. Without solid proofs, the religious arguments gradually flattened and science reigned. But not even science has all the answers.

The seeds of life sprouted only billions of years after the…


A story of the day when Buddha died.

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O n the last day of Buddha’s life, he was invited to dinner by a Smith (Cunda Kammāraputta).

And that meal became the reason for Buddha’s death.

The poverty-stricken smith didn’t have too many things to offer to Buddha. However, he collected some wild mushrooms grown in the woods during the rainy season.

With utmost dedication, the smith cooked the mushroom and offered Buddha to eat in a banana leaf. The meal was distasteful as poison but impressed by the substantial devotion of the Smith, Buddha ate it with affable delicacy.

He tried his best to veil the distaste of…


When do we go to the stars?

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Each one of us knows the reality of life. We learned it, saw it, and absorbed every fact like the sand absorbs water. Just like the wetness of sand is not felt on the surface, every human absorbs reality but lives with cultivated complacency.

Similar was the situation in my neighborhood when a senior figure passed away a few days ago. The death was sudden due to a heart attack. Soon, the funeral was done and the family returned to their homes, for other customary rituals performed in a typical Hindu family.

Waiting in the door was a 3-year-old child…


Written after losing both: hope, and the one to give it.

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How much pain can someone like us tolerate?

To my knowledge, an invisible thorn in the fingertip is unbearable. But that is just an illustration of physical torment.

Fear, anxiety, and psychological threat every moment; combined with incarceration and incarcerated life stripped naked of freedom and respect is absolutely on another level of torture.

And in the extreme end is the neverending wait for death which is approaching an inch every second. More painful is to die from the cruelty of non-rivals, to whom you have done nothing wrong. …


The secret is to use the sword in your words.

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Having spent countless hours writing, I obeyed every piece of advice on the internet. I had a niche, stayed consistent in it, socialized, and spent in SEO optimization. But the stats barely shook.

In an attempt to settle the agony, I abandoned writing for months and stayed aloof. But with the heart of a writer, I could not keep away for long.

One day, while moving through a park, I had stepped into a wrong garden, just to read this quote. I took the photograph when the warden arrived with a roar. …


Technically, he knows more than farming

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In a distant village, a farmer grew heaps of corn every year. He was among the highest corn harvester in the region.

Praised for his hard work, he was rewarded every year for it. This continued for a few years, and hearsay of his consistency spread far and distant.

Attracted by the commend, one day a reporter approached him to learn about his secrets of success.

During the interview, the farmer detailed numerous strategies he implemented for his success in agriculture. He also added that he distributed his best-growing variety of seeds among other farmers in his village every year.

Ben Guragain

Writer, Explainer and Learner for life’s little secrets. Interested in Science, Academically a Biotechnologist and Self-Aspired researcher | benuprag@gmail.com

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